Theopoetics

It's stories, all the way down.

An adaptation from Epictetus, the Handbook — May 20, 2015

An adaptation from Epictetus, the Handbook

2.
Remember: desire means grasping
at what you are desire. Hatred
means avoiding what you hate.

Not getting what you desire
equals disappointment. Getting
what you hate means misery.

Avoid what you have power
to avoid. Sickness, poverty,
death? You’ve got no power there.

Hate what you have power
to avoid. Desire what you can
get. And always, please, be
gentle, discrete, and moderate.

a translation of Epictetus from The Enchiridion — May 16, 2015
a translation of Epictetus from The Enchiridion —

a translation of Epictetus from The Enchiridion

Chapter 1: What’s Not Our Business
Some things we can do,
some things we can’t.

We control our opinions,
desires, aversions, and—
to be plain—our own emotions.

We do not control our bodies,
our things, or what others think
of us to be plain—those things
are not our business.

What happens when you try
to take power over what you
have no power over?—Can
you say “frustration”?—

Complaints Bother. Finding
fault with everything.

Take power over what
you have power over.
Then there’s no resistance.
No “no.” You won’t get hurt.

Just keep in mind what
you have power over.

Don’t cross the line.
If you forget—if you
go looking for money
and power—you might
get hurt. At any rate,
you will miss what’s
important: happiness.

Freedom.

Listen: learn what illusion looks like.
Learn to say, “Hey, that’s an illusion.”
Learn to ask: “What is in my power?”

If it’s not in your power, forget about it.

The Emperor of Mashed Potatoes — May 7, 2015
Chances are Good — May 1, 2015
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